Style Guide for Contributors

 
  • Use double quotation marks (“ ”) for quotations. For quotes within quotes, single quote marks (‘ ’) are to be used. For quotes within quotes within quotes, double quote marks are to be used again. For a single-word or very short phrases (used to exemplify), use single quotes; but if the word or phrase is a “so-called”, use double quotes. Examples: 
    • ‘Hour’ carries a cockney stamp the way ‘home’ does not.
    • India is a “democracy”.
  • British spellings, not American. ‘Flavour’, not ‘flavor’; ‘labour’, not ‘labor’; ‘honour’, not ‘honor’. Remember, it is all about ‘u’—fuck Webster!
  • Zeds over asses: Please ‘organize’, don’t ‘organise’; ‘agonize’, don’t ‘agonise’; and be ‘civilized’, not ‘civilised’.
  • Do not change spelling, punctuation or capitalization in quoted material. Quotations consisting of 40 words or more should be placed as a separate paragraph.
  • Commonly understood words from Koshur should not be italicized. They should be integrated into the text and not made to stand out. If the meaning of a word is not clear, it should be explained in its context in the text.
  • Hyphen (-) for compound constructions (or connecting a single word in a line break). Examples:
    • Gilgit-Baltistan
    • Pseudo-intellectual
    • Zanaan-mohnew
  • En dash (–) represents ‘to’ between figures or words and a compound adjective. Examples:
    • Never Kupwor–Kishtwor Kashmir. It is much more than that.
    • India–Kashmir; and never shall the twain meet.
    • 1947–2007
    • 2008–10 (also notice that it is not 2008–2010, because the second 20XX would be a repetition).
    • The Abdullah–Mufti continuum
  • Em dash (—) separates a parenthetical part of a sentence or a digression from the main argument. Examples:
    • When the education minister dared the gathering of unwilling students to give a single example in any language where a double positive can express a negative, a boy in the back rubbed his pellet-hit eye and quipped, “Kashmir is an integral part of India—yeah, right.”
    • Kashmiris want azadi from India, period—there are also human rights violations by Indian soldiers in Kashmir.
    • Kashmiris are hypocrites fighting against the Indian state while working in Indian government departments—and paying nearly half of their hard-earned wages to the same government in the form of various taxes—if they want azadi so much, they should stop working for the Indian government. Note: Close space from both sides of both en and em dashes.
  • Day–Month–Year format, sans commas: Maqbool Bhat was hanged by India on 11 February 1984 (not February 11, 1984; or 11th February 1984 or suchlike).
  • An abbreviation that is a contraction, i.e. it retains its first and last letters, should appear without a full stop, e.g. Mr, Ms, Dr, Ltd. An abbreviation that does not retain its original last letter appears with a stop, e.g. Prof., Rev.
  • For abbreviated names, there are stops but no spaces between initials, but a space after, e.g. A.A. Dar (Azad), M.A.K. Ghalib, S.A.S. Geelani. There are no stops in abbreviations like HM, JKLF, LeT, STF, CRPF, BSF. They should be spelt out on first appearance and abbreviated thereafter.
  • Capitalization: Hurriyat Conference, not Hurriyat conference, or hurriyat conference. But a conference organized by the Hurriyat Conference. The rudimentary Hurriyat Conference Constitution, not constitution.
  • Zero to ten to be spelt out, numbers greater than ten (example, 11) to be written in figures.
  • Thousands, lakh and crore for currencies of Pakistan and India. Millions for others.
  • In numbers, a comma after every three digits, right to left; except for Pakistani and Indian currencies, where the first comma appears after three digits from right to left, and then a comma appears after every two digits. Examples:
    • How much distance do Kashmiris want to put between themselves and India? 10,000,000,000 light years.
    • J&K was sold to Gulab Singh by the British for Rs 75,00,000 (nanakshahi) and an annual payment to the British Government of one horse, twelve shawl goats of approved breed (six male and six female) and three pairs of Cashmere shawls.
  • ‘Which’ instead of ‘that’ for American restrictive clauses.
  • a.m. and p.m. are lower case and with stops after both letters.
  • The title of a complete work, e.g. a book, an e-book, a newspaper, report (technical, government, etc.), dissertation, thesis, film, video, television series, podcast, YouTube video, artwork, map, music album or an unpublished manuscript, is italicized. The title of a work that is part of a greater whole (such as an article, which is part of a journal, or a book chapter, which is part of a book) is not italicized but put within single quotes.Note: when italicizing the name of a periodical, do not italicize the initial ‘the’ even if it is part of the periodical’s printed title (e.g. the New York Times).
  • Terminology: We encourage contributors as well as readers to seek and question the inherent biases in the everyday usage of language. Cases in point:
  • There is no North and South Kashmir, there are no geographical, cultural or lingual distinctions between these designated regions, there is rather a gradient in Kashmir from southeast to northwest. Also, if there is a South Kashmir, it is Baderwah, Kishtwor and Doda. Instead of North and South Kashmir, identify places by the direction and distance from Srinagar, and the nearest town (or better still, resistance landmark). Examples:
    • Pampur/Pampore, some 15 km southeast of Srinagar…
    • Shumnag, some 4 km southwest of Trehgam, MaqboolBhat’s village…
    • Bontoor, just south of Chittisinghpoor…
  • Use gender-neutral terms wherever applicable. Examples:
    • ‘Human’ instead of ‘man’, contextually; ‘humankind’, not ‘mankind’; ‘chairperson’, not ‘chairman’ or ‘chairwoman’.
    • Avoid using ‘his’/‘her’, try to wrap your head around ‘they’ instead.
  • Always spell Koshur words as if you were pronouncing them in Koshur and not some faux-Hindi or –English. Examples:
  • ‘Kãger’, not ‘kangri Even if you cannot write the words in IPA, just try the version closer to the Koshur pronunciation:
  • ‘Yejbyor’, not ‘Bijbehara’
  • ‘Chhaanpoor’, not ‘Chanapora’
  • ‘Pahaelgam’, not ‘Pehalgaon’
  • ‘Yakhaen’, not ‘Yakhni’
  • ‘Pulwoam’, not ‘Pulwama’
  • In lists of contributors, arrange names alphabetically and use normal sequences, e.g., ‘Arif Ayaz Parrey’, not ‘Parrey, Arif Ayaz’.